Investigation into the Perceptions of Students, Parents, and Teachers in China’s Education Reform in Grades 7 and 8

Main Article Content

Peter Joong Ying Xiong Lin Li Chun Jian Pan

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine how and to what extent Grades 7 and 8 teachers
have implemented educational reforms in China that have had a direct impact on students,
teachers, and parents. Major sources of data for this study were separate anonymous surveys
for teachers, students, and parents. The study concluded that teachers and parents liked the
reform initiatives. Most teachers were able to make changes that supported the reforms that
include curriculum planning, teaching strategies, student evaluation, and special education.
Teachers lacked in-service professional development and resources, especially in the rural
areas. Teachers experienced difficulties that arose from the conflict between activity-based
learning and exam-oriented systems. Parents and society need to change their mindsets of
valuing exam achievements. Chinese educators are at the crossroads of whether the ‘quality’
movement is what the students and society need at this time or make changes in the high
stakes examination. Leaders who want to implement change will have to pay attention to the
voices of stakeholders.

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How to Cite
JOONG, Peter et al. Investigation into the Perceptions of Students, Parents, and Teachers in China’s Education Reform in Grades 7 and 8. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, [S.l.], v. 1, n. 3, p. 141-154, aug. 2017. ISSN 1307-9298. Available at: <https://iejee.com/index.php/IEJEE/article/view/271>. Date accessed: 21 july 2019.
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