Enhancing pre-service elementary school teachers’ understanding of essential science concepts through a reflective conceptual change model

Main Article Content

Mehmet Aydeniz Clara Lee Brown

Abstract

This study explored the impact of a reflective teaching method on pre-service elementary
teachers’ conceptual understanding of the lunar phases, reasons for seasons, and simple
electric circuits. Data were collected from 40 pre-service elementary teachers about their
conceptual understanding of the lunar phases, reasons for seasons and day and night, and
simple electric circuits pre and post instruction. Findings show that the instructional
approach adopted by a science teacher educator had a significant impact on pre-service
elementary school teachers’ conceptual understanding of lunar phases, seasonal changes
and simple electric circuits. The discussion focuses on pre-service elementary school
teachers’ misconceptions about the lunar phases, seasonal changes and simple electric
circuits as revealed through their answers to the pre-test questions. Further discussion
focuses on the implications of the findings for pre-service elementary school science teacher
education.

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How to Cite
AYDENIZ, Mehmet; BROWN, Clara Lee. Enhancing pre-service elementary school teachers’ understanding of essential science concepts through a reflective conceptual change model. International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, [S.l.], v. 2, n. 2, p. 305-326, aug. 2017. ISSN 1307-9298. Available at: <https://iejee.com/index.php/IEJEE/article/view/253>. Date accessed: 13 nov. 2019.
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