Children’s Comprehension of Informational Text: Reading, Engaging, and Learning


Linda BAKER, Mariam Jean DREHER, Angela Katenkamp SHIPLET, Lisa Carter BEALL, Anita N. VOELKER, Adia J. GARRETT, Heather R. SCHUGAR, Maria FINGER-ELAM


Abstract

The Reading, Engaging, and Learning project (REAL) investigated whether a classroom intervention that enhanced young children's experience with informational books would increase reading achievement and engagement. Participants attended schools serving low income neighborhoods with 86% African American enrollment. The longitudinal study spanned second through fourth grades. Treatment conditions were: (1) Text Infusion/Reading for Learning Instruction – students were given greater access to informational books in their classroom libraries and in reading instruction; (2) Text Infusion Alone -- the same books were provided but teachers were not asked to alter their instruction; (3) Traditional Instruction -- students experienced business as usual in the classroom. Children were assessed each year on measures of reading and reading engagement, and classroom instructional practices were observed. On most measures, the informational text infusion intervention did not yield differential growth over time. However, the results inform efforts to increase children’s facility with informational text in the early years in order to improve reading comprehension.


Keywords

Reading Comprehension, Informational Text, Reading Instruction

Paper Details

Paper Details
Topic EU Education Programs
Pages 197 - 227
Issue IEJEE, Volume 4, Issue 1, Special Issue Reading Comprehension
Date of acceptance 01 October 2011
Read (times) 706
Downloaded (times) 466

Author(s) Details

Linda BAKER

University of Maryland, United States


Mariam Jean DREHER

University of Maryland, United States


Angela Katenkamp SHIPLET

University of Maryland, United States


Lisa Carter BEALL

University of Maryland, United States


Anita N. VOELKER

University of Maryland, United States


Adia J. GARRETT

University of Maryland, United States


Heather R. SCHUGAR

University of Maryland, United States


Maria FINGER-ELAM

University of Maryland, United States


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