The Right to be Included: Homeschoolers Combat the Structural Discrimination Embodied in Their Lawful Protection in the Czech Republic


Irena KAŠPAROVÁ


Abstract

There is a 240-year tradition of compulsory school attendance in the Czech Republic. To many, compulsory school attendance is synonymous with the right to be educated. After the collapse of communism in 1989, along with the democratization of the government, the education system was slowly opened to alternatives, including the right to educate children at home, expressed in Act no. 561/2004. This inclusive law has had exclusionary consequences for many families who wish to choose this mode of education. The situation reveals a clear struggle over various forms of capital in the field of education, as famously described by Bourdieu (1998). The article, based on a longitudinal ethnographic study of homeschooling families, maps the structural discriminative dimension of the law and displays the strategies that the actors have adopted in order to combat them. 


Keywords

Homeschooling, Structural discrimination, Education, Difference.

Paper Details

Paper Details
Topic EU Education Programs
Pages 161 - 174
Issue IEJEE, Volume 8, Issue 1
Date of acceptance 30 September 2015
Read (times) 690
Downloaded (times) 380

Author(s) Details

Irena KAŠPAROVÁ

Masaryk University, Czech Republic


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