Considering the Context and Texts for Fluency: Performance, Readers Theater, and Poetry


Chase YOUNG, James NAGELDINGER


Abstract

This article describes the importance of teaching reading fluency and all of its components, including automaticity and prosody. The authors explain how teachers can create a context for reading fluency instruction by engaging students in reading performance activities. To support the instructional contexts, the authors suggest particular text-types that are well-suited for reading fluency activities.


Keywords

Reading Fluency, Text Selection, Performance Reading

Paper Details

Paper Details
Topic EU Education Programs
Pages 47 - 56
Issue IEJEE, Volume 7, Issue 1, Special Issue Reading Fluency
Date of acceptance 01 October 2014
Read (times) 574
Downloaded (times) 223

Author(s) Details

Chase YOUNG

Texas A&M University, Corpus Christi, TX, USA, United States


James NAGELDINGER

Elmira College, Elmira, NY, USA, United States


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